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Malaria – The facts

By Warren Moore on March 2, 2008

I found this article to be extremely interesting………

MALARIA: THE ACTUAL FACTS – A NON-ISSUE

The facts speak for themselves…

Since the 1970’s, over 500,000 guests have visited the private game reserves in the Sabi Sand Wildtuin and Timbavati with ONLY 2 reported cases of malaria, both of whom experienced a very short recovery period.

W.H.O. statistics sadly include fatalities from impoverished rural areas throughout Africa, without proper medication or hospitalisation. Newly converted lodges have chosen to exploit these statistics to create a “fear factor” by advertising their lodges to be in “malaria free” areas.

The actual facts belie this negative propaganda.

1. Statistics received from the following private game reserves:
– Sabi Sabi – since 1979 there has been one reported case from a guest.
– Nottens – since 1985 there has been one reported case from a guest
– No reported cases of malaria from a guest from the following safari lodges – :
Djuma, Kapama, Kings Camp, Leopard Hills, Lion Sands, Mala Mala, Royal Malewane, Savanna, Singita, Thornybush and Ulusaba.

2. The extremely low occurrence of malaria amongst guests is also due to these lodges taking preventative measures such as:
– Surrounding areas at the lodges are regularly sprayed.
– Insecticide is applied regularly to all interior walls.
– Mosquito traps are situated around the lodges.
– Mosquito repellent for body application is supplied in every room and safari vehicle.
– Accommodation is air-conditioned.
– Accommodation windows / doors are screened.
– Guests are advised to wear long-sleeved shirts and trousers at dusk and dawn and to apply repellent to exposed parts of the body.
– As a further precaution guests are advised to use the following medication (after consultation with their doctor) – Malarone, Doxycycline or Melfloquine.

2 thoughts on “Malaria – The facts

  1. Very interesting statistics. I think this article is a "must read" for all bush enthusiasts, especially foreigners, who are often scared away from the african bush by all the negative hype. Thanks Warren.

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